演出 Concert · 2017.5.19 Blurt

Blurt

英国 United Kingdom

 

时间 Time

2017.5.19 21:20 - 22:20

场地 Venue

华侨城创意文化园北区B10现场 B10 Live, North District of OCT-LOFT

演出者 Artists

Ted Milton - 主唱 Vocals / 萨克斯 Saxophone

Steve Eagles - 吉他 Guitar

David Aylward - 鼓 Drums

 

“Blurt”,意为“脱口而出”,同时也是一支成军38年的英国老牌乐队的名字。可以毫不夸张地说,他们是最名副其实的乐队之一,因为从一开始他们就建立了一种Blurt式的传统:以现场的方式录制录音室专辑,“不加入任何录音棚技术处理……直接捕捉现场”——彻底的“脱口而出”。

Blurt成立于1979年的英国格罗斯特郡的斯特劳德小镇。成员有过数次变动,现由主唱兼萨克斯手Ted Milton、吉他手Steve Eagles和鼓手David Aylward组成。乐队早期曾与Joy Division、A Certain Ratio同台演出,也引起了英国著名音乐杂志《NME》的关注。作为英国知名独立音乐厂牌Factory Records最早签约的乐队之一,Blurt可以说是一个异类。

从后朋克、无浪潮,到实验艺术摇滚、爵士摇滚,Blurt身上的标签数不胜数,但实际上他们根本无法被归类。伴随着张力十足的吉他和部落式的鼓点,Ted Milton的演唱有着喜怒无常的情绪;或低鸣或咆哮,他用几乎把萨克斯吹成碎片的力量,演奏出不同于世上任何一种声音的极具冲击力的音乐。演出现场的观众通常先是目瞪口呆,接着肃然起敬,到最后全然入迷。

Blurt的伟大之处在于,38年过去了,他们依然保持在巅峰状态,岁月的打磨却并没有使他们的创造力黯淡丝毫。Don Cherry曾说,Blurt让他联想起早年自己与Ornette Coleman一起演奏的时光——那时的他们正走在前卫音乐的最前沿。这无疑是最高的褒奖。

 

Blurt灵魂人物:Ted Milton

Ted Milton生于1943年,是一位跨领域的表演艺术家。自认“表演瘾君子”的他,拥有萨克斯手、诗人、傀儡师等多重身份,并在各个领域都有所造诣。

作为诗人,他的部分诗作被收录于知名文学杂志《Paris Review》和1969年出版的诗集《Children of Albion: Poetry of the Underground in Britain》中。在90年代中期,他开始制作艺术家书(手工书艺术作品),其中部分作品被法国国家图书馆和大英图书馆纳入馆藏。

作为傀儡师,他曾参加国际上大大小小的艺术节,并出演由Tony Wilson主持的电视节目《So It Goes》,还为由Terry Gilliam执导的1977年喜剧电影《Jabberwocky》贡献了一段偶戏。

70年代末,他开始演奏中音萨克斯,并成立了Blurt。传奇吉他手Eric Clapton在自传中这样描述Ted Milton:“……他是我见过的第一个用身体来诠释音乐的人……为了阐释自己感受到的东西,他手舞足蹈,甚至连面部表情都用上了。看着他,我第一次理解了什么才是真正与音乐融为一体,什么才叫把音乐听通透了,活了,从而使之成为生命的一部分。”


“Blurt” means to say something suddenly and without thinking carefully enough, and also the name of an English band that has founded for 38 years. It is no exaggeration to say that they are one the most appropriately named group, as they’ve established a Blurt tradition from the very beginning of recording in the studio as-live, “no studio techniques involved at all,… snapshots”. Completely “blurt”.

In 1979, Blurt was formed in Stroud, Gloucestershire, England. Band members have changed several times and current members are vocalist and saxophonist Ted Milton, guitarist Steve Eagles and drummer David Aylward. In their early years, they shared bills with Joy Division and A Certain Ratio and caught attention of the famous music magazine “NME”. As an early Factory Records signing, they can be described as an oddball.

Though tagged with post-punk, no wave, experimental art rock or jazz-rock, the trio is practically impossible to pigeonhole. With high tensile guitar and tribal drum patterns, Ted Milton’s singing is moody. He hums or growls, blowing his sax to shreds to make forceful music which sounds like nothing else on earth. During gigs they found their audiences flabbergasted at first, awestruck at second and hooked in the end.

The great thing about Blurt is that the inventiveness of Ted Milton’s sax/guitar/drums line-up remains undimmed. Thirty-eight years on Blurt is still in its prime – the band that trumpet maestro Don Cherry once said reminded him of his early days with Ornette Coleman when they were at the cutting edge of the avant-garde. Praise from the top indeed.

 

Ted Milton

Born in 1943, saxophonist, poet, puppeteer and self-confessed “performance junkie” Ted Milton has been around several creative blocks.

As a verse writer, his work appeared in the “Paris Review” and “Children of Albion: Poetry of the Underground in Britain” (1969). In mid 1990s, he started to make art book-objects and some of his works have been taken up in the collections of the National Library of France in Paris and the British Library.

As a puppeteer he participated in numerous international festivals and appeared on “So It Goes”, the TV show hosted by Tony Wilson. He also contributed a puppetry scene to Terry Gilliam's 1977 comic film “Jabberwocky”.

In the late 1970s, he began to play alto-saxophone and founded Blurt. Eric Clapton remembered him in his autobiography as “…he (Ted Milton) was the first person I ever saw physically interpreting music... to enact it with his entire being, dancing and employing facial expressions to interpret what he was hearing. Watching him, I understood for the first time how you could really live music, how you could listen to it completely and make it come alive, so that it was part of your life.”